Folkspraak

Introduction

Native Speakers Of Germanic Languages

Design Goals And Principles

Vocabulary Design

Proposed Grammar

Vocabulary

History

Introduction [Home/Hem]

Folkspraak is a model language being designed as a common Germanic language (an "Intergerman", if you will).

Once complete, Folkspraak should be quickly learnable by any native speaker of a Germanic language (see table below), a group numbering over 465 million native speakers (with an additional 300 to 900 million speaking English as a second language).

Folkspraak is not meant to be designed by any one individual, but is a collective work created by all interested parties, according to the basic guidelines set below. You can contribute a word to the language just by sending an e-mail to Jeffrey Henning, listing your proposed word, its meaning and its form in three other Germanic languages (in addition to English). You can volunteer to have a greater part in the design of the language as well (see Further Design: How You Can Help!).

You can also join our new discussion list:

http://www.onelist.com/subscribe/folkspraakhttp://www.onelist.com/subscribe/folkspraak
Click to subscribe to Folkspraak discussion list

Native Speakers Of Germanic Languages - circa 1985 [Home/Hem]

   

West Germanic

North Germanic

DU

Dutch

17.5 million

DA

Danish

5.1 million

GE

German

98.0 million

SW

Swedish

8.3 million

FR

Frisian

0.3 million

NO

Norwegian

4.3 million

FL

Flemish

*included in Dutch figures

IC

Icelandic

0.24 million

EN

English

325.0 million

FA

Faroese

0.04 million

AF

Afrikaans

4.5 million

     

YI

Yiddish

0.35 million

     

OE

Old English

0.0 million*

ON

Old Norse

0.0 million*

*Dead language.

All population estimates adapted from The Cambridge Encyclopedia of Language, 1987.

[Wilbert Geijtenbeek provides 1999 estimates for Dutch and related languages. "There are approximately 23 million people speaking Dutch as a native language and an additional half a million as a second language. Furthermore, there are 6 million Afrikaans speakers. Finally, there are 500,000 Frisians."]

 

Design Goals And Principles [Home/Hem]

The primary objective of Folkspraak is for a speaker of a Germanic language to be able to comfortably read the language with a high level of understanding within a week and to be able to write in the language within a month.

A secondary objective is simply to create a model language through the active participation of many contributors, providing for a less solitary, more interactive hobby.

The primary design principle is that Folkspraak omit any linguistic feature not common to most of the modern Germanic languages. For instance, since English lacks grammatical gender, Folkspraak will lack grammatical gender as well. Since Swedish does not decline weak verbs for person or number, Folkspraak doesn't either. If a phoneme is not included in one of the main Germanic languages, then it is not present in Folkspraak either. (This is all meant to be subject to interpretation by the Folkspraakers; it is up to us as a community to determine what fits the Folkspraakgeist.)

A secondary goal of creating the Folkspraak vocabulary is to assist Rick Harrison in his creation of the Universal Language Dictionary (ULD). Once the Folkspraak dictionary has reached a suitable size, the cognate forms will be formatted in ULD format. (ULD already has German and Dutch lexicons, and an English definition file.)

A tertiary goal is to help people understand the common underpinnings of the Germanic languages.

 

Vocabulary Design [Home/Hem]

The vocabulary of Folkspraak will be generated by choosing a "consensus form", derived from the most common patterns of the closest equivalent words in Swedish, Danish, Dutch and German, with words from other languages used as an occasional tie breaker.

EXAMPLE - Word for "language": spraak

OE spraec

EN speech

SW spra*k

DA* Sprog

DU taal

GE Sprache

'SP' - 5 of 6 words begin with 'SP'

'SPR' - 4 of 6 words begin with 'SPR'

'SPRA' - 3 of 6 words begin with 'SPRA'

'SPRAA' - there is no consensus on the vowel and 'AA' was arbitrarily chosen (note that a better way of determining vowels needs to be developed)

'SPRAAK' - 2 forms end in /k/, other forms /g/, /ch/ are variants of the proto-Germanic /k/

[Verbs end in /-en/.]

The rules for this are still being developed.

Interestingly, Rob Ratatoskr points out, "You apparently came to the Folkspraak word of spraak, and, used in this matter, it looks exactly like if it is Dutch! The Dutch word spraak has in fact the same meaning as English speech, while taal
means 'language'. In this case, the listing of the Dutch words for 'language' as taal and no reference to spraak will probably be due to lack of a Dutch contributor, but it made wondering whether you use, to some extent, etymology in any case. Sometimes, words of the same Germanic rot have gotten a somewhat different, but still connected meaning. Would this
exclude them from being used in the project? [Not at all. I think etymologies would provide important mnemonic hooks for learners of Folkspraak. -Ed.] With regards to this, I think that even almost the same words, will in different languages, always have a slightly different meaning. Only with very concrete words like apple / appel / apfel / eple this won't be the case."

[Home/Hem]

Grammar of Folkspraak

Version 0.5.2

[Version 1.0.0, when achieved, will indicate that the grammar design is frozen]

by Dan Dawes

  1. Release Notes

    0.5.0 – Dan Dawe's initial version, June 29, 1999

    0.5.1 – Jeffrey Henning's first copy editing and formatting session, June 29, 1999

    0.5.2 – Jeffrey Henning's second editing and formatting session, correcting typos identified by Dan and integrating some of Dan's e-mailed comments into the introduction

    Your comments are welcome – please join the Folkspraak mailing list.

  2. Introduction

    The primary tongues of the currently used Germanic languages of Western Europe can be viewed as one, if in each the traits that distinguish it from its sister Germanic languages are disregarded. The result is Folkspraak, which differs from the natural Germanic languages from which it is derived as a personality type differs from the individuals it represents. – Folkspraak is derived from English, German, Dutch and the Scandinavian languages, Danish, Norwegian and Swedish, treated as one group. It is the common Germanic language of all Germanic speaking peoples and is understood, like a streamlined version of one's native Germanic tongue.

    While the Folkspraak lexical building is a separate effort, grammar of course cannot be formulated in the absence of words. Therefore, a few grammatical words have been chosen under the assumption that these words would be adopted in the Folkspraak lexicon. If this is not in fact the case, the grammatical point can be easily deduced and correctly applied to the intended word, which is adopted into the Folkspraak lexicon. If a word form or root appears or is understandable in three of the four Germanic languages (counting the Scandinavian languages as one), then it is adopted into Folkspraak.

    Here is the proposed grammar for Folkspraak. I have been thinking about this for awhile. I have not seen any other attempts. I modeled the approach closely after the grammatical approach of Interlingua, except I have Germanized it. This is an earnest approach to devise a grammar that would be simple, easy to learn and easy to master, and would seem familiar in some degree to any speaker of German, English, Dutch and the Scandinavian languages. The goal would be to have all speakers of German, English, Dutch and the Scandinavian languages
    be able to at least partially read Folkspraak without any prior exposure to
    it and be able to understand the gist.

    Now with the proposed grammar defined, we will circulate it on the web and see if we can move together in a reasoned manner to a consensus. Even in grammar it comes down in many cases to just making a judgment and a decision among a number of plausibly equally valid alternatives. If we could test the proposal by having a number of native speakers from each group evaluate the intelligibility of the grammar in some kind of survey, then we could be semi-objective. In a perfect world, we would have native speakers from each language with no exposure to the other languages try to read the text according to various grammars and
    lexicons. The most readily intelligible grammar and lexicon to such a reader would win.

  3. Spelling & Pronunciation

    The letters are those of the standard Roman alphabet without stress marks or other diacritical signs. The PRONUNCIATION is on the whole "classical" (vowels as in modern German; 'c' before 'e', 'i', 'y' like 's' or 'ts', otherwise like 'k'; 'th' like 't'; 'ph' like 'f'; etc.). The STRESS is "natural" if it falls most frequently on the vowel before the last consonant.

  4. Articles
  1. Definite Article

    The word for "the" is der for all genders (masculine, feminine and neuter) and numbers (singular and plural).

  2. Indefinite Article

    The word for "a" / "an" is en for all genders (restricted to the singular).

  3. Word Order

Articles precede the noun they modify (e.g., der Man, "the man").

  1. Nouns
  1. Capitalization

    Nouns are capitalized as in German to assist in distinguishing when a word is used as a noun rather than another form. For example, the verb infinitives can be used as nouns simply by capitalizing the word.

  2. Number
    1. Singular Nouns

      The canonical form of a noun is unmarked for singular (e.g., Man = "man").

    2. Plural Nouns

    The plural of nouns ends in -ens after consonants and –ns after vowels in all genders. For example, Man = "man" becomes Manens = "men".

  3. Case

    Nouns do not change form for case.

    1. Dative Nouns

      Indirect objects (dative) are always formed by the preposition zu = "to", as in ik gebe der Buk zu hem = "I give the book to him."

    2. Possessive Nouns

Possession (genitive) is always formed by von, e.g. Det bine der Buk von John = "It is the book of John." Folkspraak has no analogue to the -’s possessive form.

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  1. Adjectives & Adverbs
  1. Adjectives

    The adjective is invariable. It shows no agreement in form with the noun or pronoun it modifies.

    Word Order

    It precedes the noun that it modifies. For example, en gud Man = "a good man".

  2. Adverb

    Derived Adverbs

    Adverbs are derived from adjectives by the addition of -lik. For example, neu = "new" becomes neulik = "newly".

    Primary Adverbs

    Folkspraak has, of course, so-called primary adverbs, which are not derived from adjectives and do not end in -lik.

  3. Comparatives

The comparative degree of adjectives and adverbs is expressed by mehr, the superlative by der mehr. Degrees of inferiority are similarly expressed by minus and der minus.

  1. Personal Pronouns, Possessive Adjectives

The personal pronouns have two distinct forms used as subject and object (either direct or indirect) respectively.

  1. Capitalization

    Any form of the pronoun can be made into a formal form by capitalizing it where used, otherwise it is assumed to be the familiar form when used in lower case.

  2. Word Order

    The object form normally follows the verb.

    The indirect form always takes the preposition zu = "to" and usually precedes the object.

    The possessive adjective occurs immediately before the noun it qualifies.

  3. Subject Pronouns
    1. Singular

      English

      German

      Dutch

      Danish

      Norwegian

      Swedish

      Folkspraak

      I

      ich

      ik

      jeg

      jeg

      Jag

      ik

      you

      du

      Jij, Je

      du

      du

      du, ni

      du

      he

      er

      Hij

      han

      han

      Han

      hie

      she

      sie

      Zij

      hun

      hun

      Hon

      shie

      it

      es

      Het

      det

      det

      den, det

      det

    2. Plural

    English

    German

    Dutch

    Danish

    Norwegian

    Swedish

    Folkspraak

    we

    wir

    Wij

    vi

    vi

    vi

    vi

    you

    Sie

    Je, U

    i, de

    dere

    ni

    u

    they

    sie

    zij

    de

    de

    de

    de

  4. Object Pronouns
    1. Singular

      English

      German

      Dutch

      Danish

      Norwegian

      Swedish

      Folkspraak

      me

      mir, mich

      mij, me

      mig

      meg

      mig

      mi

      You

      dir, dich

      jou, je, u

      dig

      deg

      dig

      di

      Him

      ihm, ihn

      hem

      ham

      ham

      honom

      hem

      Her

      ihr, sie

      haar

      hende

      heene

      henne

      hen

      It

      es, ihm

      het

      dem

      den, det

      den, det

      den

    2. Plural

    English

    German

    Dutch

    Danish

    Norwegian

    Swedish

    Folkspraak

    Us

    uns

    ons

    os

    oss

    oss

    os

    You

    euch, Sie, Ihnen

    je, u, jullie

    jer, dem

    dere

    ede, r

    jem

    Them

    Sie, ihnen

    hun, hen, haar, ze

    dem

    dem

    dem

    dem

  5. Possessive Adjectives
    1. Singular

      English

      German

      Dutch

      Danish

      Norwegian

      Swedish

      Folkspraak

      my

      mein

      Mijn

      min, mit, mine

      min, mitt, mine

      min, mitt, mina

      min

      your

      dein

      Jouw, je, Uw,jullie

      din, dit, dine

      din, ditt, dine

      din, ditt, dina

      din

      his

      sein

      zijn

      sin, sit, han, sine

      hans

      hans

      sin

      her

      ihr

      Haar

      sin, sit, hendes, sine

      hennes

      hennes

      har

      its

      sein

      zijn

      sin, sit, dens, dets, sine

      dens, dets

      dess

      dets

    2. Plural

    English

    German

    Dutch

    Danish

    Norwegian

    Swedish

    Folkspraak

    our

    Unser

    Ons, onze

    vores, vore

    var, vart, vare

    var, vart, vare

    ons

    your

    Euer

    je, Uw, jullie

    jeres, eders

    deres

    deras

    eures

    their

    Ihr

    Hun

    deres

    deres

    deras

    deres

  6. Possessive Pronouns
    1. Singular

      English

      German

      Dutch

      Danish

      Norwegian

      Swedish

      Folkspraak

      mine

      meiner

      Mijne

      min, mit, mine

      min, mitt, mine

      min, mitt, mina

      miner

      yours

      deiner

      Jouwe, uwe

      din, dit, dine

      din, ditt, dine

      din, ditt, dina

      diner

      his

      seiner

      zijne

      sin, sit, han, sine

      hans

      hans

      siner

      hers

      ihrer

      hare

      sin, sit, hendes, sine

      hennes

      hennes

      harer

      its

      seiner

      zijne

      sin, sit, dens, dets, sine

      dens, dets

      dess

      detser

    2. Plural

    English

    German

    Dutch

    Danish

    Norwegian

    Swedish

    Folkspraak

    ours

    unserer

    onze

    vores, vore

    var, vart, vare

    var, vart, vare

    onser

    yours

    euerer

    uwe

    jeres, eders

    deres

    deras

    eurer

    theirs

    ihrer

    hunne

    deres

    deres

    deras

    derer

  7. Summary

    The Folkspraak pronouns are thus:

    1. Singular

      Subject

      Object

      Possessive Adjective

      Possessive Pronoun

      Reflexive

      ik

      mi

      min

      miner

      sich

      du

      di

      din

      diner

      sich

      hie

      hem

      sin

      siner

      sich

      shie

      hen

      har

      harer

      sich

      det

      den

      dets

      detser

      sich

    2. Plural

Subject

Object

Possessive Adjective

Possessive Pronoun

Reflexive

vi

os

ons

onser

sich

u

jem

eures

eurer

sich

de

dem

deres

derer

sich

  1. Verbs

All verbs are regular without exception. The verb has an infinitive, which can also be used as a noun, and two participles (past and present), which can also be used as adjectives. Its conjugation lacks personal endings but has a complete set of tenses (present, past, perfect, pluperfect, future, conditional), both active and passive. It has an imperative but no subjunctive.

    1. Word Order

      Word order is usually subject-verb-object. A writer may depart from the normal order for emphasis as long as the meaning is clear.

      Word order does not vary for subordinate clauses.

      The words of a verb phrase are generally used in consecutive positions without sending any part of the verb phrase to the end of the sentence.

      Questions are generally verb-subject-object followed by "?".

    2. Verbal Prefixes

      Verbs may be used with an inseparable and separable prefix. The separable prefix, which is generally also a preposition, may be placed at the end of the phrase or sentence. For example, sich aufrisen = "to get (someone or something) up"; ik rise sich auf = "I get up"; ik rise hen auf = "I get her up"; ik habe sich aufgerised = "I have gotten up."

    3. Summary

Infinitive

root + -(t)en

etten = to eat (note Etten = "an eating or meal") (when the root ends in a vowel add -ten)

Pres. Participle

root + -ende

ettende = "eating"

Past Participle

ge- + root + -(t)ed

geetted = "eaten" (when the root ends in a vowel add -ted)

Imperative

root

ett = "eat!"

Present Active

root + -e

ik ette = "I eat, I am eating, I do eat", du ette, hie ette, vi ette, u ette, de ette

Past Active

root + -(t)ed

ik etted = "I ate, I was eating, I did eat" (when the root ends in a vowel add -ted)

Future Active

wille + infinitive

ik wille etten, etc. = "I shall eat"

Conditional Active

kone + infinitive

ik kone etten = "I could eat"

Perfect Active

habe + past participle

ik habe geetten = "I have eaten"

Pluperfect Active

habed + past participle

ik habed geetten = "I had eaten"

Future Perfect Active

wille haben + root + -(t)ed

ik wille haben geetted = "I shall have eaten"

Conditional Perfect Active

kone haben + root + -(t)ed

ik kone haben geetted = "I could have eaten"

Present Passive

 

ik bine geetted = "I am eaten"

Past Passive

 

ik bined geetted = "I was eaten"

Future Passive

 

ik wille binen geetted = "I shall be eaten"

Conditional Passive

 

ik kone binen geetted = "I could be eaten"

Perfect Passive

 

ik habe binen geetted = "I have been eaten"

Pluperfect Passive

 

ik habed binen geetted = "I have been eaten"

Future Perfect Passive

 

ik wille haben binen geetted = "I shall have been eaten"

Conditional Perfect Passive

 

ik kone binen geetted = "I could have been eaten"

 

[Home/Hem]

Vocabulary For Folkspraak

Wortlist von Folkspraak, updated 12/11/99

Folkspraak

Definition

Abdomen

Abdomen

Absorben

Absorb

? Akt

Act

? Adress

Address

Luft

Air

? Luftbus

Airplane

? Lufthaven

Airport

? Alkohol

Alcohol

? All

All

? Und

And

Dier

Animal

Appel

Apple

Aprikos

Apricot

? April

April

Arm

Arm

? Artikel

Article

Ash

Ash tree

Asparges

Asparagus

? August

August

? Autoritet

Authority

? Automobil

Automobile

? Bank

Bank

? Bad

Bath

Strand

Beach

Baard

Beard

Bed

Bed

Beuk

Beech tree

? Bier

Beer

Beginnen

Begin

? Stumach (Buk)

Belly

Birk

Birch

Fogel

Bird, Fowl

? Blak

Black

Blod

Blood

? Blu

Blue

? Buk

Book

? Brad

Bread

Brost (?Brust)

Breast, Chest

? Bringen

Bring

? Braun

Brown

? Bus

Bus

Bush

Bush

? Kafe

Café

Kalv

Calf

? Kannen

Can

? Kanal

Canal

Kapacitet

Capacity

? Auto

Car

Karp

Carp

Kat

Cat

Stol

Chair, Stool

? Charakter

Character

? Kinder

Child

Skorsteen

Chimney

? Kirch

Church

? Kirch

Church

Stad

City

? Klas

Class

? Koalition

Coalition

Kust

Coast

? Kolt

Cold

? Kolonie

Colony

Kommen

Come

? Kommunitie

Community

Computer

Computer

? Konferenz

Conference

Kok

Cook

? Kul

Cool

Host

Cough

Koh

Cow

Krab

Crab

Kop

Cup

? Danz(en)

Dance

? Dat

Date

? Dag

Day

? Dezember

December

? Direkt

Direct

? Direkter

Director

Doen

Do

? Dokter

Doctor

Hund

Dog, Hound

? Dur

Door

? Drama

Drama

? Trinken

Drink

Ohr (?Eore)

Ear

Erd

Earth

Ost

East

Etten

Eat

? Efekt

Effect

? Acht (Act)

Eight

? Achtien (Actien)

Eighteen

? Achtte

Eighth

? Achttig (Acttig)

Eighty

Ellbog (?Elbog)

Elbow

Elfe

Eleven

? Elfete

Eleventh

? Anglish

English

? Eben

Evening

Oge (?Eoge)

Eye

? Falsh

False

? Vather

Father

Kran/Han

Faucet

Feder

Feather

? Februar

February

Feber

Fever

Feld

Field

Femftien

Fifteen

? Femfte

Fifth

Femftig

Fifty

? Film

Film

Finden

Find

Finger

Finger

Kamin

Fireplace

? Ente

First

Fish

Fish

Femf

Five

Fleesh

Flesh,Meat

? Blum

Flower

Rokkanal

Flue

Flieg

Fly (insect)

Skum

Foam, Scum

Fut (?Fot)

Foot

? Fur

For

Fiertig

Forty

Fier

Four

Fiertien

Fourteen

? Fierte

Fourth

? Freidag

Friday

? Vren

Friend

Frost

Frost

? Frut

Fruit

Pels

Fur, Pelt

Gavel

Gable

? Garten

Garden

? Gas

Gas

? General

General

? Herr

Gentleman

Dutcher

German, Dutch (in Pennsylvania Dutch)

? Meiden

Girl, maiden

Given

Give

Glas

Glass

? Gaanen (Gaan)

Go

? Gud

Good

? Grammar

Grammar

Gras

Grass

Grashopper

Grasshopper

? Gre

Gray

? Grun

Green

Grund

Ground

? Grup

Group

Dakrenne

Gutter

Hagel

Hail

Haar

Hair

Hammer

Hammer

Hand

Hand

? Haat

Hat

? Haben (Habban)

Have

? Haven

Haven, Port

Haselnut

Hazelnut

Hie

He

Hede

Heath

? Helpen

Help

Har

Her

Hen

Her (obj)

Harer

Hers (possessive pronoun)

Flod

High Tide

Hem

Him

Sin

His

Siner

His

Heim

Home

Horn

Horn

? Heis

Hot

? Hotel

Hotel

? Ouhr

Hour

Hus

House

Hunderd

Hundred

Orkan

Hurricane

Ik

I

Eis

Ice

? In

In

? Inkonsistant

Inconsistent

? Industrie

Industry

? Infoburo

Information office

Det

It

Den

It (obj)

Dets

Its (possessive adj)

Detser

Its (possessive pronoun)

? Januar

January

? Juli

July

? Jun

June

Beholden

Keep

? Konig

King

Kuken

Kitchen

Knie

Knee

Kniv

Knife

? Dame

Lady

Lam

Lamb

Land

Land

Blad

Leaf, blade

? Lernen

Learn

Der minus

Least (superlative comparative)

Ben

Leg

Citron

Lemon

Minus

Less (comparative)

? Libertet

Liberty

? Biblithek

Library

Licht

Light

Bliks

Lightning

Lip

Lip

? List

List

Leven

Live

Hummer

Lobster

Ebb

Low Tide, Ebb

Mashine

Machine

Makrel

Mackerel

Maken

Make

Man (?Mensk)

Man

? Marz

March

? Market

Market

? Marketplaz

Marketplace

Master

Master

Matras

Mattress

? Mei

May

Mi

Me

Miner

Mine (possessive pronoun)

Model

Model

? Maandag

Monday

? Gild

Money

Maan

Moon

Mehr

More (comparative)

? Moren

Morning

Mortel

Mortar

Der mehr

Most (superlative comparative)

? Muther

Mother

Berg

Mountain

Maus

Mouse

Mudder

Mud, Dreck

Min

My

Nagel

Nail

? Namen

Name

Natur

Nature

Hals

Neck

Nacht

Night

Nen

Nine

Nentien

Nineteen

Nentig

Ninety

? Nente

Ninth

? Ne

No, none, not

? Middag

Noon

Nord

North

Nase

Nose

? November

November

? Objekt

Object

? Oktober

October

Von

Of (genitive)

? Buro

Office

En

One

? Oportunitie

Opportunity

Ons

Our

Onser

Ours (possessive pronoun)

Over

Over

Oks

Ox

? Park

Park

? Folk

People

Shwein

Pig, swine

Ananas

Pineapple

? Ros

Pink

Planen

Plan (map?)

Plate

Plate

? Plaz

Plaza, Place

? Bitta

Please

? Polizer

Police Officer

? Politik

Politics

Poppel

Popler tree

? Projekt

Project

? Qualitet

Quality

? Radio

Radio

Regen

Rain

Rat

Rat

Rekenen

Reckon

? Rod

Red

? Respekt

Respect

Rib

Rib

Reis

Rice

Risen

Rise

Dak

Roof

Rum

Room

? Rule

Rule, law

Laks

Salmon

Sand

Sand

? Samsdag

Saturday

Sag

Saw

Seggen

Say

? Skul

School

Vitenskap

Science

Skruv

Screw

? Twete

Second

Seen

See

Senden

Send

? September

September

Seven

Seven

Seventien

Seventeen

? Sevente

Seventh

Seventig

Seventy

Delen

Share (with)

Shie

She

? Shif

Ship

? Shuh

Shoe

Skulder

Shoulder

? Dush

Shower

Sinke

Sink

Seks

Six

Sekstien

Sixteen

? Sekste

Sixth

Sekstig

Sixty

Skin, Hud

Skin, Hide

? Klein

Small

Sno

Snow

Sud

South

Spraak

Speech, Language

? Station

Station

Stier

Steer, Bull

Storm

Storm

Baek

Stream

Strom

Stream, Current

? Stret

Street

? Subjekt

Subject

? Saan

Sun

? Saandag

Sunday

Taggen

Take

? Telefon

Telephone

Tien

Ten

? Tiente

Tenth

? Danken

Thank

Der

The

Deres

Their

Derer

Theirs (possessive pronoun)

Dem

Them

De

They

Rekenmashine

Thinking-machine, computer

? Drete

Third

Dretien

Thirteen

? Dretiente

Thirteenth

? Dertig (Derdig)

Thirty

Tusend

Thousand

Dre

Three

? Dorsdag

Thursday

Zu

To (preposition)

? Isten (Binen)

To be, is, am, are...

? Ote, heut

Today

Toilet

Toilet

Tunge

Tongue

Tand

Tooth

Tornado

Tornado

Torn

Tower

? Zug

Train

Stam

Tree trunk

Forel

Trout

? Tru

True

? Densdag

Tuesday

Tolf

Twelve

? Tolfte

Twelveth

? Twintigte

Twentieth

Twintig

Twenty

? Enuntwintigte

Twenty-first

Enuntwintig

Twenty-one

? Tweuntwentig (Tweuntwenteg)

Twenty-two

Twe

Two

Auf

Up

Os

Us

Dal

Valley, Vale, Dale

Walnut

Walnut

? Varm

Warm

? Water

Water

Vi

We

Wesel (?Vesel)

Weasel

? Midwich

Wednesday

? Wich

Week

? Welkomm

Welcome

West

West

Walfish (?Valfish)

Whale

? Weist

White

Wind

Wind (Breeze)

Vindu

Window

? Vein

Wine

? Wit

With

Wolf

Wolf

? Wort

Word

Werld

World

Worm

Worm

? Skriben

Write

? Jar

Year

? Ja

Yes

Du

You

U

You

Di

You (obj)

Jem

You (pl. obj)

Din

Your

Eures

Your (pl)

Eurer

Yours (pl)

Diner

Yours (possessive pronoun)

? Zee

Sea

? Svein

Swine

? Hier

Here

? En

A, An

? Kort

Short, Small, Curt

? Korpedelens

Bodyparts

? Blond

Blonde

? Fingernagl (?Fingernagel)

Fingernail

? Lever

Liver

? Lunge

Lung

? Pels

Pelt, Fur

   

 

 

History [Home/Hem]

Folkspraak (or Folksprok) developed in the mid-60's as a pidgin speech used among an interdenominational and international monastic community located in an abandoned midieval convent on a small island off the western coast of Denmark. The experiment only lasted a few years, but it produced a flurry of interest when the religious community began to put out tourist guides, religious texts, and other writings in a newly constructed language that they called Folksprok (later Folkspraak).

In the spirit of brother(and sister-)hood that marked the community, the English, American, Dutch, Danish, German, Norwegian, and Swedish members of the "Bruderhof" had begun to coin new terms that combined bits and pieces of each of their languages. Whichever terms caught on, they continued to use. Eventually, some of the members compiled a short dictionary, grammar, and phrase-book describing Folksprok. When visitors asked about the new but easily-learned speech of the community, they were offered copies at a nominal price. Folksprok, as it was known in those days, became a fad in the late 60's among students and 'internationalists', but faltered when the monastic community became embroiled in a dispute with Danish authorities over the naming of the monastary's beer. Danish nationalists were upset that the monastary's ale was called "Folkbier", which sounded too Germanic or Dutch. They pressured Danish authorities to retract the brewing license, and as this was a major source of revenue for the community, their fortunes suffered.

The community disbanded in 1972, but the Dutch brothers and sisters maintained a house in Rotterdam, and continued to practice speaking in Folkspraak, a dialectical variation of the original tongue. The last issue of "Folktidskrift" their newsletter, was published in 1983. A Folkspraak newsgroup reportedly is occasionally active on the Internet at this time.

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